Archives for posts with tag: property value

Bringing more art to Miami is something that nobody can object. I myself love the idea of more art inmetrorail-863816_1920 the city but what I do not agree is the fact that Miami’s residents have to pay some punishing fee for that.

 

There are already many taxes, fees, and delays when it comes to the approval of city’s permit for construction. Instead of charging these fees to residents I believe it should be charged to tourists, not high fees, small fees to tourists would be enough to reach the intended purpose.

 

Let’s not make more taxes. Let private institutions develop art in the city giving them more freedom. Let’s encourage more donations but no more taxes because all that does is generate expensive local prices, fewer jobs, and less economic growth for the city.

To read the ordinance click on the link below:

Miami Art Ordinance

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FA Commercial is proud to announce the recent sale of the Plaza 8 St. Neighborhood Shopping Center located at 9600 SW 8th St. in Miami. The property was sold for $8,450,000. Fabio Faerman of FA Commercial brokered the deal as a representative of the seller. In the midst of the process, the side lot had to be appraised in order to be part of the deal. The result of the appraisal brought the property value to the price proposed by FA Commercial.

The 55,814-square-foot plaza, built in 1988, is currently 96 percent leased to tenants including New Era Health Center and Pizza Hut. New Era Health Center is a provider of mental health services and Pizza Hut is a national tenant with over 6,000 restaurants in the United States.

The location of the plaza provides the buyer with a unique opportunity for future growth, given the condensed population within the area. Sitting between the Florida Turnpike, Palmetto and Dolphin Expressway, the area attracts a strong amount of traffic with around 54,500 vehicles passing by per day. The plaza itself has direct access to two streets.

The plaza provides those in the area with a destination to seek services or simply go shopping. The land also has the potential to add a freestanding building and bring another national tenant into the community.

Fabio Faerman and his team at FA Commercial are pleased to contribute to the progress of Miami’s commercial real estate market with deals like these. Faerman also recently assisted in the sale of the land used to develop ECHO Brickell. The residential high rise on the east side of Brickell Avenue features 180 state-of-the-art residences. Designed by renowned architect Carlos Ott, the building has added to Brickell’s status as an international destination.

About FA Commercial Advisors

FA Commercial Advisors provides a complete range of commercial real estate brokerage services – including owner and tenant leasing, acquisition and sales, marketing and consulting – to owners, investors and lessees of all property types. With an extensive international network of real estate professionals throughout the world, we offer local market knowledge on a global level.

About Fortune International Realty Commercial Division

The Commercial Division was created to offer specific advice and service to sophisticated clients, searching for a deep understanding of real estate businesses.  This division has the purpose of coordinating and providing services to Fortune International Realty clients as well as residential and commercial associates interested in pursuing commercial real estate transactions.

With flagship retail popping up all over Lincoln Road, the pedestrian mall has never been more popular or, through the lens of real estate, more valuable. Until now, of course. This week, the record setting sale of 530 Lincoln Road gave us a glimpse into the area’s impressive future. The property was sold to Tristar Capital for $30 million.

South Beach, even with its luxurious retail market, has yet to see a deal like this. At 10,000 rentable square feet, the deal amounted to $3,000 per square foot. The building is an optimal site for redevelopment as the ground-floor is currently housing two short-term leases.

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530 Lincoln Road

The property, which was once owned by the family of The Miami Sound Machine’s own Gloria Estefan, was sold in 2010 to local business, Lincoln 530. Lincoln 530 purchased the building for $12 million and first began testing the market in March of 2012. At the time, they opened with an asking price of $28 million. The final sale ended up exceeding those grand expectations.

Tristar Capital is expected to request the city for permission to add 3,000 square feet to the building. Although, the property could easily be leased to multiple tenants, the opportunity exists for Tristar to take advantage of a recent Lincoln Road trend: two-story, single-tenant retail.

Recent notable retailers to open mega-stores on Lincoln Road include Forever 21, H&M, and Zara. In fact, 530 Lincoln is located directly across the street from the former Symphony Building that is now home to H&M’s flagship store. With the amount Tristar has invested in the property and the recent activity on Lincoln Road, expectations will be sky-high for 530 Lincoln.

The scientific community estimates that the first financial effects of rising sea levels will be felt in a matter of two decades. Some highly regarded scientists project an earlier date, around one decade from now. Either way there is one harsh truth, no area in the country will feel more of an impact from rising sea levels than South Florida and much of that financial impact will come from real estate.

Storm a comin'

“Even a six-inch rise would cost the area much of its acreage.”

A three-foot rise in sea levels would change South Florida as we know it, leaving a large part of the region under water, but even a six-inch rise would cost the area much of its acreage. The timetable for when such a rise would occur is not completely reliable, but the most widely used projection is that of the Army Corps of Engineers. This group projects that South Florida will see a three- to seven-inch rise in sea levels by 2030. A sea level rise of nine to 24 inches could be expected by 2060.

According to a group formed by the Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach and Monroe Counties called the Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact, the region would lose up to $4 billion in taxable real estate from even a one-foot rise in sea levels. A three-foot rise would cost around $31 billion or more.

Professionals are beginning to wonder when the devaluation of waterfront property in South Florida will begin. Most likely, this process will occur as flooding in the area begins to increase. Along with the inconvenience of constantly flooded streets, buyers will grow wearisome of rising premiums for flood insurance. Most climate change experts expect this to begin occurring a decade from now.

However, there is hope for normalcy in the future of South Florida real estate as many entities have already started planning for these events. For example, the City of Miami Beach has dedicated $200 million to stop flooding in South Beach over the next 20 years. The real estate industry itself is also preparing. Many urban planning groups are taking rising sea levels into consideration when discussing projects with developers.

These are all strong first steps, but more work will need to be done to prepare for drastic changes in regards to waterfront properties or perhaps to attempt to prevent some of this damage from being done. Over the next decade, South Florida should be a melting pot of interesting and revolutionary ideas that will help the real estate industry overcome rising sea levels.

Over the summer statistics pointed to South Americans as the heroes in the South Florida real estate market. However, recently it seems that cash-buyers from down south may have some competition in the northeast. That’s right, the new boon to the Miami market is coming from the Big Apple.

Brokers in the area have reported a 25 percent uptick in purchases from New Yorkers. Our northeast neighbors are now competing with foreign investors for prime Miami real estate and, in many cases, are willing to pay more. The main reason? Their lack of sensitivity to rising prices in the area. New York is widely known as one of the most expensive markets in the country, giving residents of the state a thick skin for the prices in Miami’s luxury markets.

New York is now the largest feeder market for South Florida. As a matter of fact, New Yorkers have accounted for approximately 15 percent of sales in the luxury real estate market this year. Luxurious condos in Brickell are seen as a bargain in comparison to Manhattan prices.

Purchasing real estate in Miami has tremendous benefits for New Yorkers, as well. The main bonus for these buyers is the opportunity to escape their rising state taxes and head on down to Florida, where there is no state income tax . Setting up shop in South Florida has become a great way for high earners from New York to save a ton of extra cash, making it so that these luxury condos practically pay for themselves.

Of course, New Yorkers do not have to sacrifice much culturally when making the move to Miami, either. Like New York, Miami has no lack of places to visit or events to take part in. Specifically, the rising Wynwood art scene and multiple cultural festivals make for an easy sell to prospective buyers looking for the New York lifestyle.

With their low sensitivity to Miami’s beachfront prices and their desire to escape burdensome income tax, New Yorkers are making the transition without missing a beat. With buyers coming from both foreign and domestic regions, the Miami-Dade market is on the rise.

This past week Miami Today spoke to FA Commercial Advisor’s very own, Fabio Faerman to get his perspective on the booming real estate market in Miami’s downtown area. Faerman divulged some interesting tidbits for investors interested in the future of Brickell.

Take a stroll down the streets of downtown Miami these days and it is easy to see that times are once again changing. While South Florida may have experienced one of the largest busts in the real estate crash years ago, the recovery, particularly that of the Brickell area, may be one of the most rapid in the nation. Several sites are set for demolition and construction cranes have now become the “unofficial bird” of our city. Existing buildings are chipping in, too. Many office buildings have begun pouring millions of dollars into upgrades.

Faerman says that all of this excitement is attracting celebrities, financial advisors and families alike to move downtown and experience life on Miami’s sunny shores. Faerman receives calls from buyers looking to invest in Brickell about one to two times per day.

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The beautiful Brickell skyline

Last year, a buyer purchased a package from Faerman that included the landmark Tobacco Road, River Seafood & Oyster Bar, as well as six parcels on Seventh Street for $12.45 million. With values currently sky-rocketing, Faerman estimates that the same assemblage would be sold for double that amount this year.

Those are prices that buyers these days are more than willing to pay, if the investment properly fits their objectives. For example, this past summer Swire spent $64 million to acquire 700 & 710 Brickell in order to build One Brickell CityCentre, the 80-story gateway to their $1 billion Brickell mega-project. Faerman believes this deal was good for Swire because it gave them the Brickell Avenue frontage that their project needed.

Faerman touted a river-facing site behind Brickell CityCentre that could have that type of value for the right buyer. The 2.52-acre off-market property would give a potential investor the opportunity to create a mixed-use project of up to 1.98 million square feet. The owners are seeking a buyer in the range of $100 million for this site, which Faerman says has, “huge potential.”

The Federal Bureau of Economic Analysis recently released new numbers indicating that the real estate sector accounted for nearly a third of South Florida’s economic growth last year. The $274 billion economy expanded at a rate of 3.5 percent, the largest that the tri-county area had seen since 2006 and well past the national average of 2.5 percent.

Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach have the real estate sector to thank for their exceptional rate of expansion. In 2012, real estate accounted for $52 billion contributed to the South Floridian economy. That number represented an 8.4 percent growth from real estate’s contribution in 2011.

Much like the overall numbers, real estate also experienced it’s best year since 2006, displaying the close-knit relationship that the sector has with the area’s economy. South Florida also experienced the sharpest growth rate of all of Florida’s largest economies.

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Condo prices have seen strong increases in each of the past 26 months

This report comes on the heels of more good news for the real estate sector in Miami-Dade. The month of August brought another double-digit surge in the year-over-years numbers for prices and sales in the area. Single-family home sales experienced an increase of 15.1 percent from August of 2012, while condo sales also gained 7.9 percent from last year.

The median sales price of a single-family home in Miami-Dade increased 2.2 percent to $235,000 from July to August. That price represents a 20.5 percent surge from the previous August. The price of condo sales saw a spike, as well. The new median sales price of $180,500 represents a 5.3 percent increase from last month and 27.5 percent year-over-year growth. Condo prices have seen strong increases in each of the past 26 months.

Real estate, however, was not the only contributing factor to the surprising growth rate in South Florida. Sectors such as trade, finance, retail and information also played an integral role in the area’s progress. The success of the retail sector speaks volumes for commercial real estate prospects in the South Florida area.

The economic data is in and things are just heating up. In May of 2013, prices in the commercial real estate sector continued building on a strong recovery according to the CoStar Commercial Repeat-Sale Indices (CCRSI). According to CoStar, the indices measure the change in prices by using a repeat sales methodology. Simply put, when a commercial property is sold, the indices calculate the difference between that sale and the previous sale of the same property.

However, there are several indices used to give a clearer picture of the environment in commercial real estate. This past May, commercial real estate saw price growth across the board.

Beginning with the value-weighted U.S. Composite Index, a measure which is influenced by the fewer, but larger commercial real estate transactions. In May, the value-weighted index saw an increase of 0.7 percent, but that does not tell the entire story. From the low point of the index in 2010, the measure has increased by 41 percent. That’s a rate of about 3.4 percent per quarter.WEB-SoldSign-SubjecttoContract-WP_304

The other important measure in the CCRSI report is called the equal-weighted U.S. Composite Index. This measure is the counter-balance to the value-weighted, as it is heavily influenced by many smaller magnitude commercial sales. The equal-weighted index increased by 2 percent in May, bringing the measure to a 10 percent increase from it’s bottom in 2011. With this strong May number, there is reason to remain hopeful that this index may just be hitting it’s stride.

The second quarter of 2013 has also been extremely strong for Net Absorption, which measures the change in space for the three main commercial sub-categories: office, retail, and industrial. This measurement, however, has been strong for the past three years, indicating that the fundamentals of commercial real estate may be stronger than previously perceived. The investment grade, a part of the equal-weighted index that measures upper-middle tier properties, also grew by 2.6 percent in May and by 24.6 percent since a 2009 trough.

Perhaps the most optimistic data comes from the decline in distressed sales. No measurement points more strongly to a fundamental commercial real estate recovery. In April and May, properties sold at distressed prices decreased to 14.1 percent, this two-month average is the lowest it has been since 2008. Less properties sold at distressed prices indicates that prices are moving in an upwards direction, giving both buyers and sellers the necessary confidence to achieve stronger deals.

As those in the market continue to remain weary of economic headwinds, the data is pointing in the right direction. With rapid increase in prices, a bigger fear could possibly be pricing certain buyers out of the market. However, the fundamentals of the commercial real estate sectors are strong for the moment and the momentum seems to be in our favor.

We’ve been discussing it for months, if not years, and now it seems to all be coming to fruition. The Miami-Dade real estate market is well on it’s way to soaring past pre-recession peaks and setting it’s eyes on historic highs. It is certainly a very exciting time to be living this city, and an incredibly opportunistic time to be working in the development, construction, or real-estate sectors.

Leading the way in this boom is the downtown area, as we have discussed previously. The Real Deal South Florida reports that out of the 23,000 condos built in the area from 2003 to 2012, 93 percent have been sold. This has led to a dramatic increase in assessed property values (6.4 percent) and asking prices, but also an inventory crunch. Not to worry, developers have gracefully accepted the challenge. There are currently 5,500 condo units planned for development in downtown Miami.

However, other areas have assisted in making Miami-Dade one of the most attractive counties for real-estate investment in the country. Jade Signature in Sunny Isles, from our very own Fortune International, is one of the most breathtaking developments in South Florida. Designed by the famed architecture team, Herzog & de Meuron, the latest Jade project has already surpassed $300 million in sales. Miami Today also recently sang praises for the Coconut Grove area, where condos and single-family residences are primed to reach new peaks. The luxurious Grove at Grand Bay is the most appealing of many new preconstruction projects in the area.

This has all, of course, led to an increase in economic activity and tax revenue for the city of Miami. The Miami Herald recently reported that property-tax rolls have increased by 3.39 percent in 2013, marking the second consecutive year of growth. With a higher tax base, the city can expect government downsizing to slow down and taxpayers will in-turn see more bang for their buck.

However, one must always account for negative indicators, as well. This boom is not being felt, for example, in Florida City, where taxable value has decreased by 5.58 percent. Hialeah has also seen their rolls decrease by 3.5 percent, though that could be attributed to a new homestead exemption for low-income seniors. Even areas such as downtown, where values are skyrocketing, run the risk of growing too quickly and pricing too many people out of the market.

Overall, the news is too optimistic to end on a negative note. So, in that case, let’s enjoy this awe-inspiring preview video of Fortune International’s Jade Signature:

Jade Signature Sneak Peek Video from Jade Signature on Vimeo.

By Yudislaidy Fernandez

The third consecutive countywide decline in taxable property values puts more pressure on cash-strapped local governments, but a projected jump in new construction next year from projects in the pipeline could offset another possible decline.
Since 2008, Miami-Dade property values have fallen steeply, but construction activity compensated for that because it meant new taxable properties were headed for the tax roll.

But that hasn’t been the case in recent years, with few cranes erected as a result of the real estate meltdown and lending freeze.
In the past three years, the county has been hit with an overall decline in taxable values of more than 24%. That’s a 9.5% dive in 2009, 13.4% in 2010 and an estimated 3.3% this year, pointed out Miami-Dade’s Property Appraiser Pedro Garcia.

During the building boom, Miami’s skyline was abundant with cranes from residential and office projects under development.
“Now, the only cranes you see are at the Marlins stadium and the building under construction in the Health District,” Mr. Garcia said. “That tells you everyone is waiting to build, but no one is building.”

But that could soon change, as several mixed-use projects could break ground between the end of this year and beginning of 2013.
In Miami’s Omni area, longtime Miami developer Tibor Hollo is close to starting to build the 35-story Sonesta Mikado Hotel & Residences.
Nearby, 13.9 acres of waterfront land owned by the Miami Herald were sold last month by its parent company, McClatchy Co., to Malaysia-based casino company Genting Malaysia Berhad to build a hotel, shops and convention center.

In downtown Miami, MDM Development Group appears set to move ahead with Met Square and Met 3, which are to add a Whole Foods Market, movie theater and 2,000-car garage.
Across the Miami River, Hong Kong-based Swire is to build the 4.6 million-square-foot Brickell CitiCentre, which is to house a shopping center, hotel, two condo towers and an office building.

In Key Biscayne, an Argentinean developer is close to starting four 14-story residential towers in a highly-coveted oceanfront site, formerly home to Sonesta Beach Hotel.
Although these projects have different timelines and some could take years to finish, these developers are confident about starting construction soon. As project phases are completed, they would be added to the tax roll.

This year’s estimated property values, released May 31 to municipalities and other taxing authorities to begin budget preparations, show that some cities saw a rise in values, including Coral Gables, Pinecrest and Key Biscayne.

Sweetwater saw an unusual 262% jump in property values because it annexed a two-square-mile unincorporated area that included Dolphin Mall.
This year, only one city, Florida City, badly hit by the foreclosure plague, had a double-digit decline in values at 15.4%, vastly improved from last year’s 20-plus local governments with double-digit falls.

The appraiser’s office is to send truth-in-millage notices to individual property owners Aug. 24 with their properties’ assessed